How to Use Custom Validation Message In Laravel?

6 minutes read

In Laravel, you can use custom validation messages by passing an array of custom error messages as the third parameter to the Validator::make() method. This array should contain keys corresponding to the field names being validated, with the values being the custom error messages you want to display.


For example, if you have a validation rule for a field named "email" and you want to display a custom error message if the email field is empty, you can pass an array like this:


$messages = [ 'email.required' => 'Please enter your email address.' ];


$validator = Validator::make($request->all(), [ 'email' => 'required|email' ], $messages);


This way, if the validation fails and the email field is empty, the custom error message "Please enter your email address." will be displayed instead of the default error message.


You can also use custom error messages for specific rule sets or for all validation rules in your application by using the Custom Validation Language Lines feature in Laravel. This allows you to define your custom error messages in a separate language file and easily manage them across your application.

Best PHP Cloud Hosting Providers in July 2024

1
DigitalOcean

Rating is 5 out of 5

DigitalOcean

2
AWS

Rating is 4.9 out of 5

AWS

3
Vultr

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

Vultr

4
Cloudways

Rating is 4.7 out of 5

Cloudways


What is the impact of using custom validation messages on user experience in Laravel?

Using custom validation messages in Laravel can have a significant impact on user experience. By providing specific and clear messages to users when errors occur during form submission, it helps to guide users on how to correct their mistakes. This reduces frustration and confusion for users, ultimately leading to a more seamless and positive experience on the website or application.


Custom validation messages also make the overall user interface more user-friendly and accessible. Instead of generic error messages that may not be easily understood, custom messages can be tailored to the specific validation rule that was not met. This allows users to quickly identify the issue and take appropriate action to fix it.


Additionally, custom validation messages can help to establish trust and credibility with users. When users receive clear and helpful error messages, it demonstrates that the website or application cares about user experience and is committed to providing a high-quality service.


Overall, by using custom validation messages in Laravel, developers can enhance the user experience by providing clear guidance, reducing frustration, and improving the overall usability of the website or application.


How to link custom validation messages to specific form inputs in Laravel?

To link custom validation messages to specific form inputs in Laravel, you can use the messages() method within the validation rules of your form request.


Here's an example of how you can link custom validation messages to specific form inputs in a Laravel form request class:

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
namespace App\Http\Requests;

use Illuminate\Foundation\Http\FormRequest;

class YourFormRequest extends FormRequest
{
    public function authorize()
    {
        return true;
    }

    public function rules()
    {
        return [
            'name' => 'required',
            'email' => 'required|email',
        ];
    }

    public function messages()
    {
        return [
            'name.required' => 'Please enter your name.',
            'email.required' => 'Please enter your email address.',
            'email.email' => 'Please enter a valid email address.',
        ];
    }
}


In the rules() method, you define the validation rules for each form input. In the messages() method, you define the custom validation messages for each specific rule. In this example, the custom validation messages are linked to the 'name' and 'email' form inputs.


Make sure to import your form request class in your controller and use it in your validation logic. Like this:

1
2
3
4
5
6
use App\Http\Requests\YourFormRequest;

public function store(YourFormRequest $request)
{
    // Handle the request
}


By following this approach, Laravel will automatically use the custom validation messages you defined in the messages() method to provide feedback to the user when validation fails for the specific form inputs in your form request class.


How to translate custom validation messages in Laravel?

To translate custom validation messages in Laravel, you can follow these steps:

  1. Create a new language file:
  • Navigate to the 'resources/lang' directory in your Laravel project
  • Create a new directory for the language you want to add translations for (e.g. 'fr' for French)
  • Create a new file for validation messages in the language directory (e.g. validation.php)
  1. Add custom validation messages to the language file:
  • In the validation.php file, define an array of custom validation messages in the format 'attribute.rule' => 'message' (e.g. 'email.required' => 'Le champ email est requis')
  1. Set the application locale:
  • In the config/app.php file, set the 'locale' value to the language code you created the translations for (e.g. 'fr' for French)
  1. Use the custom validation messages in your validation rules:
  • In your validation rules, use the custom messages by passing an array of messages as the third argument to the Validator::make() method (e.g. Validator::make($data, $rules, $messages))
  1. Display the translated validation messages:
  • When validation fails, Laravel will automatically use the translated messages from the language file you created


By following these steps, you can easily translate custom validation messages in Laravel to support multiple languages in your application.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Telegram Whatsapp Pocket

Related Posts:

In Laravel, once you have validated a request input using the validation rules, you can modify the input before proceeding with further processing or saving it to the database. Here's how you can modify the request input after validation:Start by creating ...
To validate a Persian Slug in Laravel, you can use the "regex" validation rule provided by Laravel. This rule allows you to specify a regular expression pattern that the input must match in order to be considered valid.To validate a Persian Slug, you c...
To capture the GraphQL error message in a Relay, follow these steps:Use the environment object provided by Relay to execute the GraphQL query.Wrap your query in a catch block to capture any possible errors.Extract the error message from the caught error object...